How to write a critical voice in your writing?

How to write a critical voice in your writing?

Postby Fionasheng » Mon Dec 01, 2014 9:20 pm

Same as the topic.THX :D
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Re: How to write a critical voice in your writing?

Postby adaqu » Tue Dec 02, 2014 9:02 pm

Critical voice probably is one of the most useful skill that we have learned. According to one of my EAP teachers Kym, critical thinking is crucial for our further education. According to my other EAP teacher Sheldon, critical voice can be developed in three ways. Firstly, we can evaluate the value of the author. Secondly, the credit of sources can be estimated. Moreover, the judgement can be made by further reading which is task-related, and make comparison between the extra reading and the text.
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Re: How to write a critical voice in your writing?

Postby maxthenomad » Tue Dec 02, 2014 9:51 pm

Here to learn from Ada, waiting for more instruction.
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Re: How to write a critical voice in your writing?

Postby sheldon » Wed Dec 03, 2014 9:51 am

I think Ada's reply is insightful and captures the main point. In searching for information on this online I found this brilliant article from Leicester University: http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/writing/writing-resources/critical-writing. My Masters (in Educational Leadership) is, by coincidence, from Leicester University. A simple guideline they gave for one assignment was that being critical meant providing 'at least three different perspectives that are justified (ie referenced) and that are compared and contrasted'. The essence of being critical is that you need to question what you read. It doesn't necessarily mean you don't believe it. The usual meaning of 'criticize' is 'disapprove', but it also means 'find the good and bad aspects of sth', which is the meaning here for 'critical'. One of the main problems students have is they read only one source, and base all their arguments on that one source. But what if most other sources all have completely the opposite idea? How do you know unless you read more? So that is what the summary from Leicester means, that you don't just consider what one writer says, you consider at least three writers on the same topic, and find similarities and differences. If they're all saying the same thing, it's probably true (but maybe not!). If they all have different views, you have to decide which one you agree with. It may not be the same one as your classmates, or even your teacher. But that's fine. This is part of the 'academic debate'. If everyone had the same idea about everything, we would never learn anything new.
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Re: How to write a critical voice in your writing?

Postby sheldon » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:48 am

I've updated this website to contain a page on critical writing. See http://www.eapfoundation.com/writing/critical/. This might add more detail to my answer above.
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Re: How to write a critical voice in your writing?

Postby lanalan » Tue Aug 08, 2017 5:26 pm

I've always been interested in this issue, but how many would not study, although your articles are certainly useful, but for myself I decided that it would be easier to address professional writer for all research papers in university... Because some people just do not know how to write on their own. And not that I would not try (
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Re: How to write a critical voice in your writing?

Postby david963 » Fri Aug 11, 2017 6:54 pm

The key to mature writing is learning to write critically. Without criticism, texts that you read have no life beyond that of the author. Without criticism, you also have no distance from the text by which you give life to yourself as a thinker. Why is this the case?

I'm sure that all of you have heard someone assert views with which you strongly concur or which you strongly oppose. If she/he does not attend to the nuances of her/his views and proposes ideas without attending to possible exceptions to them or problematic aspects of them, we soon turn away from her/him and dismiss her/his views. If we are sympathetic toward the position being asserted, we find that merely having our own views confirmed is of little interest. By analogy, most of us do not spend hours looking in a mirror: we look in a mirror to get our bearings for the day; then we go on about our business. Hearing or reading words that only mirror our own thoughts leads to the same result: we turn away to go on to more interesting activities. In sum, even if we are sympathetic toward the views expressed, Online Shopping In Pakistan only if an author exercises a capacity to call into question her own ideas do we find ourselves engaged by her words. We want to think further than we have previously about ideas with which we have sympathy.
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